10 reasons why you should visit Moldova

1- It’s the least visited country in Europe

Yes, it’s true! Statistics say that in the year of 2018 only 20,000 tourists have visited Moldova, which in comparison to other countries it is rather low. But for you this is great news as you will not have to suffer from long queues or bumping into tourists at every corner.  And it is a great benefit because Moldova is somewhat of a mystery to most people as they have never even heard of it, so you’ll come here with no expectations but pure curiosity.  Due to lower number of visitors you can experience the place most authentically and enjoy the hospitality. As most locals are curious about why are you even coming to Moldova, you will experience mostly positive encounters. And hey, who doesn’t like to walk on the less beaten path? You’ll sure make an impression on your friends for having courage to explore such an unknown territory!

2 – Good quality

One thing that impresses most people when visiting is not actually the price, but the quality – of the food, wine and accommodation. Being an agricultural country with a lot of fertile soil such as cernozem, the care that is put into growing food is not just essential, but hereditary. Generations of wine makers and land workers are keeping the tradition alive by growing rich crops and turning them into delicacies. The rapport quality-price is undebatable when compared to the European market and even if there is still some room for the improvement of certain services, many of the hotels and apartments will provide great accommodation options. From big spaces and modern repairs, up to comfort and spa options, if you’re looking to pamper yourself up you will not be disappointed.

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3 – The food

Putting aside the price and quality factor, the local cuisine is also another great reason to visit the country. Historically as the region was mostly romanian, but also under the turkish and the russians, the influence can be felt in the variety of dishes. The most famous traditional dish is Mămăligă, a type of polenta (corn porridge) which is eaten with fresh local cheese and sour cream, but also can be served with scrambled egg or meat. Then the “sarmale” or also named “găluște”, like the turkish dolma are cabbage or grape leaves stuffed with a rice, carrot and meat filling. Stuffed peppers are also easily found, alongside a variety of meat balls “pârjoale” and “cighiri” and vegetable stews “tocană”. And let’s not forget the famous pies “plăcinte” which can be sweet or savoury with pumpkin/ apple/ sour cherries/ potato/ cabbage/ cheese fillings. Diving into soups you can discover “zeamă de pui”, a local chicken soup, but also can easily find the russian borsch, soleanka and okroshka (a cold summer soup). Ukranian dumplings which we call “colțunași” and russian salads such as shuba and olivie are plenty alongside the homemade fruit drink compot . If you wish to try more of the local delicacies, then have a go at the local dishes with rabbit meat or test your test buds with some pickled watermelon.

4 – We have the biggest wine cellars in the world (and also great wine!)

We might not have an Eiffel tower and fame like the french wine, but we have the biggest wine cellars in the world. Yes, that’ s right – Mileștii Mici winery is registered as the biggest in Guinness World Record Book for it’s underground cellars that stretch over 200km’s, but also for having the biggest wine collection. Cricova winery comes in second, with over 60 km’s and over 30.000.000 litres of wine produced. With a strong wine culture, over 140 wineries and 8% of the worldwide wineyards being situated in Moldova, it was bound that we would hold a unique record in regards this. Visiting these two wineries is possible alongside the others by booking a tour with them at least 1 day upfront. But the love of wine does not end just here. Each year on the first weekend of october moldovans celebrate National Wine Day in Chișinău and with a growing wine tourism industry, various other festivals and wine tasting events are popping up across the country. There is no lack of wine on the shelves of the bars, shops or even locals home cellars.

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5 – The soviet vibes

Despite being independent for 28 years, the soviet past can still be felt. It’s influence still vibrates through the socio-economical and political sector as the country is trying to recover and stabilise itself in a healthier manner, but the wound is still fresh. From soviet monuments, mosaics, museums, architecture and cars, the remains of the fallen regime can still be seen when visiting. You can find some Lenin statues, soviet post offices and shops in villages, books and memorabilia at flea markets and also an abandoned soviet bunker besides the brutalist architecture.

6 – We have a country within the country

For those that like to travel to “spicier” places, we’ve got it for you- Transnistria – the country that is not recognised, but has it’s own currency, border, military, government, anthem, bank and phone service. Being a frozen conflict area since the fall of Soviet Union, the territory has become quite a curiosity for most tourists when visiting Moldova, especially that most countries do not advise people to visit it. Enmeshed in a lot of scary stories about Russian military, difficult border crossing and bribery myths, visiting it is actually much simpler than expected. If you do plan on coming here, do your research right and make sure to register at the border!

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7 – No tourist tax

As silly as it may sound, it is a valid reason. There is no tourist tax around due to being a small industry but also due to the low number of tourists . So you won’t be needed to pay extra 3 euros or more just for visiting or staying in a specific area/ hotel. The fewer expenses, the happier the wallet!

8 – It’s the best place for recharging your batteries

Have you seen how green the country is? It’s the perfect place for a relaxing break! Just take a walk through the city’s parks and you will be amazed by the sensation of being out in nature. And with the laid back atmosphere, you will not feel like in a busy and tiring metropolitan city. Seeking a more outdoors getaway? No problem! Plenty of lakes and rives, hills and cliffs for walks, biking, hiking, camping, swimming or fishing. You will find various places across the country where you can relax with a glass of wine, some bbq or just tan under the sun. The natural reservations are easy to visit and if you’re lacking vitamin D, you can fix it here because Moldova was actually the sunniest state from the former Soviet Union countries! We might not have mountains or seaside, but we have a bundle of good energy and the treasure of the piece of land that we’re on – abundance of trees, beautiful landscapes and delicious fruits.

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9 – Internet friendly

Surprisingly to some, Moldova actually ranks in top 10 countries with the fastest and best internet speed in the world. So if you’re a digital nomad or just work remotely for your job, this place should be suitable for you. Not to mention finding easy internet access even on the street or cafes, not having to buy a coffee somewhere just to get the wi-fi password which a lot of us let’s face it, find it very annoying when traveling! And if you’re afraid that you’ll get lonely, not a problem! Across the capital you can easily find co-working spaces or IT hubs which you can join and they are very english friendly. So combining with the other benefits of cheap living expenses and being in between Europe and the Eastern world in case you wish to travel around, I see no reason why you shouldn’t give it a go here!

10 – It’s cheap

One of the greatest benefits of visiting Moldova is that it’s quite cheap. Despite not being everything for 1 euro cheap, there are a few things that are under that price. For example most of the museums in the capital have an entrance fee of 10 lei (50 cents), while public transport 2 lei (10 cents) for a trolleybus ride.  For 1 euro you can have 10 trolley rides in the city! A ride with the bus to the Transnistrian capital Tiraspol is 40 lei ( 2 euros), while to Orheiul Vechi even less. While in most European countries you will pay from 25 euros for a bed in a hostel, for the same amount (or less depending on location) you can rent a room in a hotel or an apartment. Hostels are priced from 5 euros per night, while an average meal out will be between 5 to 10 euros.  And to quench your thirst, a 0.5L water bottle starts from under 50 cents, while a beer one from 60 cents and for 2 litres you’d have to pay 1,50 euros in the shop. Now for wine, vodka, brandy… you got the message I think 😉

Pohrebea Village

Many have heard about the moldovan hospitability, but few know where to search for it when they plan to visit Moldova. A place with such a treasure can easily be found towards the north-east of the country, just 38 km’s from Chisinau on the left side of Nistru river. The village is named Pohrebea and it hosts a population of 700 people. Despite sounding like it is part of Transnistria due to being on the left shore of Nistru river, it actually is part of Moldovan territory. But only a very few kilometres from it’s entrance it has the Transnistrian border control and a fair share of history.

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The history of the village starts from the 1769, the year when it was first recorded. The first settlers where refugees of the Moldovan principality which were under tumultuous times due to various wars and constant changing of rulers. The name of the village can be traced from a legend saying that the settlers were moved from the Pogrebeni village during the war. As a majority of them were of russian origin and they had the tendency to build their houses in the shape of cellars (cellar being called “pogreb” in russian), the name came up from their building style, initially “Pogreba” and then later turning into Pohrebea. Nowadays the village has a variety of styles in regards its houses, with some having even a cellar in the hill accompanying the village.

The two things that this village is mostly famous for, is the destroyed church and the island in the middle of the river. The church is named Saint Aleksei, in the name of the son of the russian tsar Nikolay II. It is said that his son was sick from a young age and he was seeking ways to cure him. Upon visiting a monk he was told to build a few churches across certain locations, Pohrebea being one of them. Despite not curing his son, the church has survived to this day including two major wars.

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In august 1944 during World War II Moldova was a major battle front. During the operation Iasi – Chisinau, the church was used as a fortress by both the nazi and the russian troops. To this day the scars of the battle can be seen in the walls of the church as many bullet holes are left. The top of the church was also blown leaving it up to this day an open space. As in Soviet Union religion was forbidden, the church was transformed into a deposit and then later in 1992 during the Transnistrian war it was used again as a fortress. The only difference was that this time the bullets were coming from the other side of the shore! With no money for restoration the church has been left in the same condition since these bloody events, reminding the villagers daily of them.

Looking at the brighter side, Pohrebea has something unique – an island in the middle of the river. But it’s not the island itself that makes it special, but the inhabitants on it! It ain’t called the “Cow’s Island” for nothing… and yes, you’ve read that right! This island is inhabited by the cows of the villagers throughout the warmer seasons. Just as the water gets warmer in spring, the cows are taken to the island by swimming and are left there until mid-autumn. Then three times a day, every single day the women are rowing the boat to the island in order to milk the cows and bring it to the village. They are more than happy to do this as they claim that the milk comes out much better and the cheese much tastier. This curious activity has even raised some interest in the local filmmakers which are shooting a documentary at the moment about it.

But besides these things it is the atmosphere of the village that makes this place special. A quiet journey into the moldovan village life where everyone will greet you on the street despite seeing you for the first time in their life. A peek into the local shop will take you in soviet union as nothing has changed since, except the currency and the food products. While exploring the paths around various courtyards, you will end up either up on the hill or down by the river shore where you can watch the locals working on their fields.

And if you wish to experience a local way of life, you can stop by at Alex’s house, the warmest person who is open to receive guests including overnight. Unlike most of the young people that move away from countryside, Alex choose this lifestyle consciously. Alongside his two dear dogs he is spending most of his time here working for the community, but also pouring his love into the Earth growing a variety of  vegetables, fruits and herbs. Hikes along the river, seasonal plant picking, working in the garden, local homemade wine and food tasting or even milking a cow are things that he can offer if you come to visit him. Not to forget discovering the local fauna and specific night time tours are also available! From july also happily providing overnight stays in his traditional moldovan house. In order to find out about the availability or to get in touch with him, you can do so through our contact page or reach him directly on this facebook page.

In regards reaching Pohrebea, there isn’t much of a difficulty as there is a direct minibus that leaves from the central bus station in Chisinau every hour from 8am until 6pm. The return route towards the capital is narrower, with the last bus leaving at 4pm from Pohrebea. The cost of a ride is 20 lei (1 euro) and it takes around 45 minutes drive. Ofcourse hiring a tour guide, driver or renting a car is also possible. In case that you choose to go by public transport, go a bit earlier to get a seat as the bus can fill quickly and it may not be most comfortable to be standing, especially in the summer heat!

ATU Winery

If you’ve ever wondered if an urban winery exists, well seek no further! ATU Winery is the answer. Situated at the entrance of the city, the first glance over the building indicates that there is something different about this place. A passion for wine, aesthetics and art have created this interesting combination into the brand that seeks to promote artisanal wines with an urban feel.

The history of ATU Winery starts with the founder Victor Vutcarău, who’s family has always been involved in viniculture. From 2001 they started growing a variety of grapes, currently being the best producer of wine plants on the moldovan and eastern european market. With this involvement and the gathered knowledge, the decision to open up a winery came naturally. From 2016 alongside his wife Vlada, the brand came to life under the name “ATU” which is a romanian word signifying “a strong point”. Besides the vast experience with plants, they are also the only winery in Moldova with it’s own wine nursery which they consider to be one of their main strength.

The production of this winery is a selective one, concentrating on dry and semi sweets wines, including the local moldovan Fetească Albă and Fetească Neagră. The main aim being creating high quality wines, they are limited edition with each type coming up in a batch of only 2000 bottles which allows them to give their full attention to every single drop. This is seen also in their production as everything is manually manufactured, from the grape picking all the way up to the bottle labelling. Not to mention the artistic detail that is invested in their brand, a way to promote local talents and urban culture.

Being mostly found on the moldovan market, their wines can also be purchased in a few shops in Austria, Luxembourg, Germany and Romania. But the best way is to visit the winery itself, where Victor or Vlada will take you through the journey of their wine production and the wine tasting experience. They offer 3 options for their visits, packages which give a variety of explorations of their main wines, but also when it’s the season – the young ones. Prices for the tours including wine tasting are in between 10- 18 euros per person. Booking upfront is required, a process easily done through a call, their website or social media. Also you can find them throughout the year at various events and wine exhibitions either in Moldova or in Europe.

To book a visit or find out more about them, check out the following links:

Website/ Facebook/ Instagram

 

KaraGani Winery

Down in the south of Moldova in the city of Vulcănești you can find a treasure. Only 200km’s from Chisinau, near the Ukranian border, the KaraGani Winery has it’s place. A name rather new on the Moldovan wine map, but not one to be missed that’s for sure.

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The tradition of winemaking in the Cerven family comes all the way from their găgăuzian ancestors, an ethnic group with turkic roots that settled in the area. As the craft for wine was passed down over 4 generations, the wife Lora and husband Gheorghe took their passion a few steps further, developing it into a business. Although they started producing their wine for the public only 2 years ago, they have already gained various recognitions and awards at local and international wine contests.

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Each year their produce only 10.000 bottles for public consumption which can be purchased in a few shops across the capital, in Comrat and also directly from them at the winery. The production process can be seen during an excursion as they take you through the whole process and a visit in autumn guarantees you to watch and even participate in their production.

Besides winemaking, they also offer a peek into Găgăuzian traditional life in their own self made museum which consists of objects gathered throughout the years of their families. From pictures of their relatives, to old irons, lamps, Găgăuzian furniture, handmade carpets and a trunk full of grandmother’s wedding dowry will leave you impressed and gasping for more stories.

Winetasting at KaraGani is a must and the basic tasting package comes with 3 wines, including one white, one red and one rosé. While you’re enjoying the wines, Lora or Gheorghe will tell you various stories about each wine and their history. The price for the excursion which includes the wine tasting of 3 wines costs only 150 lei (~7 euros) and it lasts for 1 hour.

For those wishing to immerse themselves deeper into the Găgăuzian culture, Lora offers the option of tasting their national cuisine with delicacies like homemade cheese, gozleme and their famous lamb dishes – kaurma, shurpa, etc. Such experience lasts 3 hours and it costs 25 euros, including the excursion and the wine tasting of 4 wine types. Master classes are also available for those that wish to learn both their cooking and winemaking crafts. Such options need to be discussed and booked upfront at least 1 day before your arrival.

Visiting such a small winery will be something memorable as you get to experience the authentic Moldova – a local family producing wine in their own yard. And how does their wine have a Găgăuzian accent (as they state in their company slogan) will be something that you will have to discover by yourselves.

To book your visit, get in touch with them at least 1 day before your arrival through their KaraGani Winery page or at the number: +373 69124996

 

 

Găgăuzia – autonomous area

Găgăuzia is an autonomous region of Moldova, but unlike Transnistria, there are no borders and own currency here. Ethnically Găgăuzians are Turkic in origin, with their ancestors coming all the way from Altai region. Later on they migrated from Bulgaria together with ethnic Bulgarians and settled in Bessarabia (Moldova) between 1812 and 1846. Nowadays the region is comprised of one city, two towns, twenty villages and three communities. The most interesting fact is despite their turkic roots, they are affiliated with the Eastern Orthodox Church.

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They have their own language which is taught in 55 schools, although Găgăuz is still not used as the language of instruction in educational institutions. Russian and Romanian are the official languages in Găgăuzia, and the majority of the population prefers to speak the Russian language.

If Găgăuzia is of any of interested to you or on your list to visit, then here are a few suggestions for what is there to see or experience.

In Comrat you can spend a few hours with a visit included at the National History and Etnographic Museum (entrance 10 lei) which has a collection of historical, cultural and even botanical exhibits. Nearby you will find monuments for the fallen soldiers in Afghanistan and the tankists, Comrat Art Gallery which showcases local găgăuzian art, the cathedral, turkish library Mustafa Kemal Atatürk and ofcourse Victory Square which has a statue of Lenin in front of their administrative building. Also in the city you can find the Comrat Winery which is their main wine producer.

Heading more south, the next stop is Beșalma village for the Ethnographic Museum which contains all the history of the găgăuz nation in a wonderful collection. The local guide does the tour only in russian, so if you wish to visit this museum, try to have a translator with you. If booked upfront, they can organise a little concert also with their national music, traditional clothing and dances.

If anyone is interested in postcards and pretty much soviet style, the post office across the street from the museum will be by your liking. A room where you can send mail, pay bills but also buy things from the counter just like in soviet times it is still very well alive. The villagers are very friendly and will be more than happy to try to converse with you even with the language barrier. A few metres through the village and you can see the Beșalma windmill, the one of last ones in Moldova.

Other things that are worthy to visit, specifically for discovering the food, is the Gagauz Sofrasi in Congaz (biggest and most condensed village in Europe). This is a traditional găgăuz style house which offers local food, lodging, but also experiences such as witnessing a traditional wedding, milking the sheep, wine tasting and even trying out therapeutic sheep wool beds. Keep in mind that they cater for groups of a minimum of 4 people only and require a +24 hours booking upfront.

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And last but not least, deep in the south of Moldova (about 3 hours drive from Chișinău) is the KaraGani winery . Not only they provide wine with găgăuzian accent, but also traditional food cooked by the owner and which has been recognised internationally and included in books about moldovan cuisine. Besides this, they have built their own little museum about găgăuzian culture with objects gathered by their family throughout the generations.

Despite being a less traveled destination and not as many amenities in the region, it is still a day trip that easily could be enjoyed.

Visiting Moldova in Winter

Despite being a season less visited, winter has it’s own charm and perks. Overall the moldovan winters are somewhat unpredictable now showcasing varieties of warmer days with degrees above zero and  others lower temperates under zero, with or without snow, sometimes even heavy one. The lowest temperature that can reach is about -25 degrees Celcius, but this usually lasts for about a week or maximum two throughout the whole of winter. Due to such conditions we ask that if you’re planning to visit Moldova in winter, please keep the following things in mind:

  • dress up warm (hat, gloves, scarf, winter jacket, non slippery + water resistant shoes)
  • icy roads – in the city or driving across the country
  • some areas are harder to reach or visit due to snow and ice (hiking areas specifically) and some amnieties are closed throughout winter, for example Soroca fortress.
  • due to unforseen weather some tours, events, roads can be closed so allow space for flexibility and changes

Now what about happens in Moldova during winter? What things can you see, do and how does it look? Here are some examples to keep in mind when you’re planning your journey here:

Christmas Market in Chișinău takes places every year between the 15th of December until the 15th of January. The whole winter decorations are spread throughout 3 areas of the city centre: main Christmas tree in front of the government building, a little family fair in front of the Opera & ballet Theatre and the Christmas Market on the 31st august 1989 street.

You will find a variety of activities to occupy your time here. From merry-go-round to booths which traditional Moldovan pies and food, snacks and sweets, traditional goods made from leather and wool, plenty of balloons and toys for kids and even mulled wine (plenty of wine!) for the adults. On weekends there is live music at the main stage which offers a programme of folk winter songs and also modern music. Last but not least, plenty of decorations and space for taking pictures and an ice rink for those that wish to skate.

As about the rest of the country, well, just like the capital they offer their own entertainment. The bigger cities will have decorations and events going on.

Visiting villages around Christmas celebrations is quite interesting because you can experience our winter traditions. Kids go around houses carolling, then around New Years with the “Sorcova” and “Plugușorul” to bless who they visit. They all wear specific clothing or traditional elements when doing this. If you’re staying overnight in some of the villages you can experience the “soba”, our traditional heating system which warms up not just the wall and the stove, but it’s also a bed on which you can have the sweetest sleep. Daytime if the weather is nice you can join the children to ride the sledges or if available have a ride with a horse sledge.

The holiday season ends around the 14th of January and the country gets back to it’s usual routine, including the children as they finish their winter holidays. The rest of January tends to be more quiet, but then comes February which brings 2 holidays celebrating love: Valentine’s Day and Dragobete – traditional romanian Valentine’s day celebrated on 24th of February. Most restaurants, bars, clubs and even wineries offer various offers, concerts and events to celebrate these, so if you’re visiting around this time, you will find something to do. Also as spring is approaching, you will start seeing loads of white and red threads being sold across the cities, “Mărtişor” a traditional symbol that is given from 1st of march to celebrate the coming of spring.

So despite sounding like winter may complicate your travel and prevent you from visiting or doing certain things, it offers also an alternative to those – experience winter traditions and life of the region. And then come back during warmer season to see a complete different life!

 

Transnistria

One of the biggest mysteries of Moldova which everyone wishes to see is Transnistria – a piece of territory which has been autonomous since 1992 and is stuck in a frozen conflict. Advertised as a dangerous area, with most embassies not advising to go there, having russian military and the necessary border control, Transnistria has created quite an image for itself. But is it really that scary?

Historically Transnistria became a state of it’s own on 2nd of september 1990 when it was proclaimed “Dnestrian Moldovan Republic” right after the fall of communism. As Moldova gained it’s independence in 1991 and was registered as a member of UN on 2nd of march 1992, it signed a military intervention in the region to get rid of the rebel forces (which were helped by the soviet army) that have been taking over. After a few months of war and deaths, on 21st of july 1992 Moldova signed an agreement of peace with Russia. To this day Russia keeps it’s military and supports this region politically and economically, but it does not recognise it as an independent country.

Nowadays Transnistria has become quite a treasure for tourists. It has uniqueness, it’s own passport and currency. Entering the region one is required to register at the border control which takes a short time without any trouble and no bribery is needed or required whatsoever. Due to the influx of tourists they even speak a bit of english at the border now.

The first city after passing the border is Bender. Here you can visit the “Bender Fortress” which is situated right on the shore of river Nistru (Dniestr). The Military Cemetery and Memorial of Military Glory are both situated in the centre of the city. Please note that Transnistria has it’s own currency, so if you wish to buy your entrance at the fortress, museums or anything else, you need their local roubles.

Despite Bender and Tiraspol are separated by the river, they are united by a bridge and they have the trolleybus 19 that connects both these cities. At the entrance of Tiraspol you will be greeted by the famous Sheriff Stadium.

In Tiraspol itself most of the amenities for visiting are situated along the main road, so getting lost is not much of a possibility. Suvorov’s Statue, The Government building and the Lenin’s statue, House of the Soviets, House of Advisors, Tiraspol’s Museum, The Eternal Flame Memorial and the Tank, The Nistru Bridge, ruins of the fortress Tiraspol, The Cathedral, green market and a ride with the boat are things that you can explore. If you like alcohol then maybe you could book yourself a tour to the Kvint Distillery or Buket Moldavii winery, both of which require booking in advance.

But Transnistria does not end here. Besides Bender and Tiraspol there are other cities too. Nearby Tiraspol you can visit the beautiful Noul Neamt Monastery which is a monk monastery. In village Târnauca you find the “Museum of the bottle” which is a private museum founded in 1988 and hosts around 20.000 bottles from over 170 countries. A fun fact as well is that is the biggest building in the world in the shape of a bottle!

Driving more up north the country you can visit the Grigoriopol, Dubasari or Rabnitsa city which is considered the north Transnistrian “capital”. Beatiful spots of Transnistria can be observed from the shore of Molovata, Saharna, Japca Monastery, Lalova and others. During warmer season boat rides can be booked along the Nistru river which give you the opportunity to see both the shores.

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Art Galleries in Chișinău

Finding some art in Chișinău is not that hard, especially that most of the galleries are situated in the centre of the city. Here is a list of places to sweeten your eye with local artworks or exhibitions.

 

National Art Museum

The one and only National Art Museum in the country which stretches it’s treasures in 3 buildings with stunning historic architecture. The museum hosts over 39,000 pieces of art which are of moldovan, romanian, russian, turkish, asian origin dating from 15th up to 20th century. You can find thematic or international exhibitions taking place too. A must see for culture diggers!

Open: Tuesday – Sunday

10:00 – 18:00 (april to october)

10:00 – 16:30 (november to march)

Entrance fee: 10 lei, free for everyone on last weekend of the month

Gallery guiding: in Romanian or Russian the price is of 50 lei, a tour in English is 100 lei.

Address: str. 31 August 1989, nr. 115,  Chişinău,  MD-2012

 

 

Galeria Constantin Brancusi

Opened since 1990, this gallery is under the tutelage of Union of Artists from Moldova. They host a variety of exhibitions, from local artists up to college or university students final works.

Open: Monday – Sunday 10:00 – 17:00

Entrance fee: 5 lei

Address: Blvd. Ștefan cel Mare și Sfînt 3, Chișinău 2001, Moldova

 

 

Galeria OU

The newest gallery in the city with a twist! Have you ever been to a gallery that it’s in a cellar? If you haven’t, then you have to visit it! Created by local artists to spice up a bit the alternative and young scene, as well to promote local talents through monthly events and exhibitions. For 200 lei you can buy one of the eggs at the entrance which each contains a piece of art Made in Moldova which is one of a kind!

Open: Monday – Saturday 12:00 – 16:00 (closed in winter)

Entrance fee: Free

Address: str. Sciusev 79, Chișinău

 

 

Gallery Alexander

A gallery shop where you can find authentic moldovan artworks of different styles and types of art. A warm atmosphere and amazing pieces of art guaranteed!

Open: Tuesday – Saturday 10:00 – 19:00

Entrance fee: Free

Address: str.  Bănulescu-Bodoni 41, Chișinău

 

Galleria 73

This is a concept store which exhibits, promotes and sells contemporary Moldovan art. The stylish interior and the exhibited works take you out of the mundane world into a world of wonder, colour and magic.

Open: Monday – Saturday 10:00 – 19:00

Entrance fee: Free

Address: str. Mihai Eminescu 41/1

 

Zpațiu/ Zspace

An alternative space specifically dedicated to the independent art scene from Moldova. Every month they organise different exhibitions, installations and performances. Besides shows, they offer as well workshops and lectures with international artists. Zpațiu can be visited mostly when a show is on, so for that please check their Facebook events page.

Open: when a show/ exhibition is on

Entrance fee: Free

Address: str. Sciusev 103 (inside the Muzeul Zemstvei, turn right on the hall)